Student name:

Jennifer Rolph

Graduation:

2017

Title:

A GIS-based accuracy evaluation of a high resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-derived Digital Terrain Model  

Abstract:

This project presents an evaluation of the accuracy and error   distribution of a high resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) derived Digital Terrain model (DTM). This exercise involved determining a flight plan   to collect imagery from which to extract a georeferenced point cloud containing   elevation values through digital photogrammetric processing, resulting in a   Digital Surface Model (DSM). The DSM was refined to a DTM reflecting only bare earth values through an editing process of point classification. From   the DTM, the surfaces of slope and aspect were derived and assessed using   spatial statistics. The accuracy assessment of this spatial data presents a   characterization of the error in the differences between the UAV derived   elevation, slope and aspect surfaces, referenced to elevations of GNSS RTK   Survey Points, as compared to a DTM of 2-meter resolution derived from   digital photogrammetry based on large scale aerial survey (SCOOP Data, OMNR   2013). Statistical analysis included an examination of the distribution of   error based on distribution plots, descriptive statistics and normalcy   testing, reporting of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), percentiles and confidence intervals, both with and without major outliers. Significance   testing of results showed no significant difference in means or distributions   between UAV and SCOOP derived DTMs, though the UAV DTM showed lower RMSE and   percentile statistics at a higher frequency than the SCOOP DTM in stratified   accuracy testing. Statistical analysis and accuracy reporting is stratified based on Non-Vegetated (NVA, Fundamental) and VVA (Vegetated, Supplementary) stratums, in adherence to ASPRS 2014 positional Accuracy Standards for   Digital Geospatial Data. This study has shown how a lightweight UAV can   contribute to terrain-based studies for small geographic extents, by   collecting high density elevation data with good accuracy. The UAV DTM is   represented by 0.25 m NVA accuracy at 95% confidence, and 0.10 m accuracy based on 95% RMSE, the level at which the data exhibits a Normal   Distribution. In the VVA the accuracy equates to 0.08 m accuracy based on the   90th percentile statistic.

 

Student name:

Tyler Pubben

Graduation:

2017

Title:

The use of UAV collected imagery in conjunction with Structure from Motion photogrammetry to derive geologic structure information

Abstract:

This research project explores the possibility of using Structure   from Motion photogrammetry in conjunction with UAVs and handheld camera   systems to improve the quality of data collected during geologic field data collection.   Structure from Motion photogrammetry was used to reconstruct georeferenced   models of geologic outcrops near Exshaw Alberta from which structural   information was successfully measured. The use of photogrammetric methods to   generate this point cloud allows for the archival of the structural component   of the outcrop as can be done using LiDAR, but also allows for the   application of photographic texturing so that the outcrop may be revisited in   virtual form. This research evaluates methods to help automate structural   measurements using edge detection methods on both standard RGB digital   photography and VNIR (Visible to Near InfraRed) to project marker points onto   the point cloud. When compared to ground truth data, the measurements   obtained through this method are within a 4.22° variance in strike or trend   and 3.68° variance in dip or plunge. Of note is the fact that these   accuracies are attainable using the camera system’s internal GPS and require   no further ground control points. The Python modules developed during this   research should allow rapid implementation of this system in a production   environment. With further research and development, it may be possible to   reliably automate the archiving of geologic outcrops as they exist at the   time of data collection while simultaneously extracting detailed structural   measurements that would otherwise be difficult or dangerous to obtain in the   field.

 

Student name:

George Barian

Graduation:

2017

Title:

Development of a GIS application for modeling marine oil spills 

Abstract:

The purpose of this research is to develop an oil spill trajectory   computer model, based on alternatives to existing comprehensive models, and   create with this model an efficient, accurate and easy to use GIS application   for modelling marine oil spill trajectories in Salish Sea. The first phase of   the project involved analysis of the existing models and establishing   performance and design criteria for the oil spill model. In the project’s   second and third phases, the oil spill trajectory model and a computer   application based on that model were developed. In the fourth and final   phase, the developed model was validated, and results were assessed. The research applies a novel alternative approach to marine spill trajectory   modelling, based on the Cellular Automata (CA) principle. To our knowledge, it is the first attempt to develop a CA based oil spill trajectory model and   application that can be used for modelling real marine oil spills. The   developed application may serve as a valuable tool for oil spill emergency responders and the general public in the Salish Sea area.

 

Student name:

Aaron Wong

Graduation:

2017

Title:

Evaluating the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in Belize

Abstract:

Marine Protected Area (MPA) has been a common management tool for   conservation and protection of the marine environment from human impact in   the recent years. Belize was one of the first countries to implement MPA in   the management of marine ecosystem, and annual monitoring was conducted to   report the status of the different MPA using a few indicators (coral cover,   algal cover, herbivorous fish biomass, and commercial fish biomass). However,   reports were not consistently generated to evaluate the implementation of   MPA. This research aims to evaluate the effectiveness of marine protected   area (MPA) in Belize by analyzing the various indicators mentioned above that   are actively collected annually in various synoptic monitoring program (SMP)   sites in Belize. Each of the indicators was analyzed to identify whether the   indicators are at different levels in different zones of an MPA. Also, the   change of each indicator (response ratio) was compared amongst the different   zones to see whether the change would be higher in one zone than another.   Lastly, the spatial relationship is examined between sites and zones to see   whether sites with more favourable condition are concentrated in particular   zones. Although no spatial relationship was found between sites and zones and   no pattern was identified from the response ratio in different zones, this   research found that conservation zone, in general, has a significantly more   favorable condition than other zones. This research also demonstrated the   importance of enforcement in MPA, when TAMR, an MPA that was not enforced   prior to 2015, was excluded from the analysis, coral cover and commercial   fish biomass was significantly higher in conservation zone than all other   zones. This study can be used by the agencies in Belize to prioritize areas   that are most in need of management actions, due to their unfavorable   condition compared to other regions within the same MPA. Furthermore, this   research will help in convincing more fishers that are opposing the   establishment of MPA that MPA are beneficial to the environment and are a means to maintain the sustainability of resources.

 

Student name:

Gregory Hay

Graduation:

2018

Title:

Geoduck Density Modelling

Abstract:

The Pacific Geoduck, Panopea   generosa (Gould, 1950), is a commercially harvested species that is   naturally distributed in beds along the entire B.C. coast. A species   distribution model (SDM) for the geoduck has been developed to aid and   enhance current knowledge of their presence in unknown areas. The model is   based on bathymetric variables and substrate. The Broken Group Marine Park   located on the West coast of Vancouver Island in Barkley Sound was used as a   control site, as no commercial harvesting has taken place. Recent scientific biomass surveys (2012-2014) undertaken throughout the park by industry and the DFO provided the biomass and substrate information. Bathymetry was   provided by the CHS for use in the bottom mapping layers. Manipulation of the   data layers into an export table for predictive modelling used ArcGIS, with   the model being created in R. The model uses a general additive modelling   (GAM) algorithm with a poisson distribution and evaluated with the   cross-validation method. Three models with different data sets made up the study:   a global model encompassing all the beds of the control group, and two local   models, each using the data from one geoduck bed. An explained deviance   (goodness of fit) of 33% was achieved for the global model, and 68.8% and 70.2% for the local models. The models can predict within a range of 0 - 40 but have difficulty with higher count accuracy. Overall the model creation   was a success, and application to beds in the control area can aid in future   surveys. It can also be applied to any bed coast wide, data permitting.

 

Student name:

Cassandra Clouston

Graduation:

2018

Title:

Evaluating Geographic Information System methods to enhance a park visit

Abstract:

Visitors to a park may not be aware of all the activities the park   offers, due to the lack of signage or an informational kiosk. Having a system   in place to allow visitors to become informed of the park’s assets will   enable them to enjoy it more fully. With today’s location aware technology,   an interactive and informational experience can be achieved to enhance the   public’s knowledge of their surroundings. This research project evaluated Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology as a basis for enhancing a   visitor’s experience for park environments, using The Assiniboine Park English Garden located in Winnipeg, Manitoba as the grounds for this investigation.   This research may set a precedent for other parks and green spaces to invest   and adopt technology to create an informative and exploratory environment for   their visitors. The methodology of this research was guided by multiple   factors. The evaluation of existing GIS methods used in similar locations   were reviewed to look at the capabilities of current technology: paper maps,   QR Codes, Web Map Tours, Web Apps and Native Apps. A determination of how to   use GIS to produce a database that would analyze not only the physical entities of the park like pathways and statues, but also the seasonal aspects   were undertaken. A questionnaire was conducted with park visitors to gather   an understanding of the visitors’ acceptance of the technology proposed. The   results of the survey were used to evaluate which of the proposed   technologies would be appropriate to implement and guide the prototype development and evaluation. The English Garden staff were supportive in   providing their expertise about the existing methods at use in the garden and   also as a source for data. This data included AutoCAD files, excel   spreadsheets and hand drawn sketches. The data was converted and, along with   newly collected data, was organized into a geodatabase for use in Esri ArcGIS software suite.

Need more information?

Request Information

Want to talk to someone about specific questions?

Contact a Representative

Ready to join us at VIU?

Apply Online